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Chalina

Spring is almost here, winter has thawed, and it’s time to enjoy the outdoors again. MyCajita’s Chalina box has just what you need to stay warm in style. Our 100% cotton, handwoven Chalina is perfect wrapped around your shoulders, a beautiful, colorful addition to any outfit. Also included is our Chiapas Earrings, these hand-stitched earrings feature geometric patterns in vibrant colors and are great paired up with your Chalina. Go out and enjoy the day in style!


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Member price $45. Non-Member price $55. 

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$55.00

What’s Included:

  • (1) Chenalhó Chalina -  6' x 20” approx.
  • (1) Set of Chiapas Earings -  3" - 4" variation

Want another option? Check out this month's featured boxes.



Your Purchase Makes a Difference:

          • Woman Empowerment
          • Artisan Made
          • Preserves Tradition
          • Job Creator
          • Supports Small Business

Chiapas Chalina Rebozo Shawls

How It's Made

Chenalhó Chalina

The tellar de cinturon, backstrap loom, one of the oldest methods for weaving textiles and creating the first articles of clothing, dates back to 2000 BC. This deceptively complex method works by stretching the threads between a stationary object and a strap that is wrapped around the waist of the weaver, the weaver becoming part of the loom, their expert hands weaving each string, the constant leaning forward and pulling back of their bodies to create tension and tighten the weave. Working 5-6 hours per day, each Chalina takes 5 days to make.


About the Artisan

Nestled deep in the Sierra Madres mountains of Chiapas, passing tall pine and oak trees rests the small municipality of Chenalhó. The town was created in 1934 but the Tzotzil people have lived here since around 300 AD, trading Quetzal feathers, amber, and salt with the Aztecs and Zapotecas. Preservation of their language and traditions are important here, Spanish is a second language, and almost all of the older men and woman dress in their traditional garments. The women start weaving as early as eight years old, they make their own clothes as well as make various textiles to support themselves and their family. This group of women formed a cooperativo, a co-op, called Las Girasoles to help support each other, preserve their traditions, and ensure a fair wage for their work. With over 50 women working together, they are excited to share the fruits of their labor with you.